Same sound but different meanings, 6 examples of Japanese Kanji names

In Japanese, just one Kanji character can mean a lot of things. Even if the sound is completely the same, it can have various meanings depending on the Kanji characters used in it. Therefore Japanese people carefully choose characters for their name.

I’ll show you example using my name “Junko” and my husband’s “Shintaro”.

Same sound but different meanings, 6 examples of Japanese Kanji names

Pure Junko

This is my original name “Junko”.  The Kanji KO means children and most typically used suffix for a girl’s name. My JUN means pure, honest or docile in Japanese. So in short, my name means “a pure child” 🙂 Junko is a very common name in Japan and you can find many other Junkos. I’ll show them below.

order Junko

order Junko

Modest Junko

This is another variation of Junko. In this time, this “JUN” means order or being modest. This Junko might be more quiet and polite than me.

Same sound but different meanings, 6 examples of Japanese Kanji names

Thoughtful Junko

This version of JUN means sober and thoughtful. It seems that this Junko will be a legitimate person in the future. 

Like this, the Japanese Kanji name can mean various if the sound is the same.
Next, it’s Shintaro’s turn!

Same sound but different meanings, 6 examples of Japanese Kanji names

Careful Shintaro

This is Shintaro’s original characters. This SHIN means modest, careful or refrain from something. Taro is the typical suffix for a boy’s name.

Being modest and not making noise in social has been considered a virtue in Japan. I guess that’s why this SHIN is preferred.

new Shintaro

new Shintaro

Forward-thinking Shintaro

This SHIN means new. He might be forward-thinking and like something new.

believe Shintaro

believe Shintaro

Strong-willed Shintaro

The character SHIN used in this version means believe. He will grow a person who has a strong mind and believe himself, or he will put trust in his fellows.

How do you like it? That’s just a mere variation of millions of Kanji names. There’s a Japanese proverb, “Names and natures do often agree”. Even the Kanji character you choose might be included in your nature.

The Japanese parents carefully choose Kanji characters for their children and  put their heart into it. We can guess what kind of person our parents want us to be from the Kanji character in our names.

Now you’ve found that I’m pure person and Shintaro is a modest person. Ask it’s true or not? Hmm… I think that’s good guess 🙂